collector of worlds

terrarium collection blog
I warn you that this is, apparently, a pretty boring drawing.  Evidence: I kept falling asleep at my computer while drawing it.  I actually started this collection a few weeks ago when I ended up drawing this instead.  My interest in all things mossy was renewed last week when my terrarium popped up over at the Naughty Secretary Club and in the accompanying Storque article.  Maybe I should make a real one this summer.  You know, to be all trendy and stuff.

Other drawing type stuff I’ve been up to:

ToF blog

I made this new logo for our beloved playgroup.  Yes, we are fun.  Tots of fun (get it?).  Too bad the ladder doesn’t lead to the top of the spiral slide (that’s, um, what the S is supposed to be).  Maybe I should propose a name change to Tost of Fun.  We’re moving back to Ontario soon and will miss our CT friends very much.  Thanks for playing with us.

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habitat 1

terrarium-1-blog

Mossy terrariums are super popular over at Etsy.  I can only assume that the trend all stems from the awesome terrarium I put together when I was little.  I had this gigantic plastic genie bottle thing that I loaded up with mosses and other stuff from the woods at my cottage.  I also found a little inhabitant for my terrarium.  His name was Skippy.  He was a bright orange slime mould.  Yes, I had a pet slime mould.  One day, I couldn’t find Skippy.  Around the same time, I read The Two-Thousand-Pound Goldfish.  The combination of these events led to a few sleepless nights during which I imagined that Skippy had slipped out of the terrarium, grown infinitely in size, and was coming to smother me for taking him out of his natural habitat.  In actuality, he probably shriveled up.  Sorry, Skippy.

how to recognise a gnome house, part 2

Apologies for the late posting.  Distractions abound!  Here are some tips to expand upon my PSA from Sunday.  Good luck everyone!

NB: I do not condone gnome hunting, or any hunting, for that matter.  These tips are intended to aid in unobtrusive gnome observation only.

ps: if you can’t read the tips, you can click on the pic for a bigger version.

how to recognise a gnome house, part 1

When I was little, I spent a lot of time in the woods (and still do, when I have the chance).  Much of that time was spent looking for little houses belonging to gnomes and other small woodland inhabitants.  I figure that I should really pass on what I have learned about identifying their natural habitats.  A D&H PSA, if you will.

Check on Wednesday for part 2: the legend.